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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
presidential election in the united states. there were people people saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops off and michele bachmann drops off and left with a last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person. finally you get the last person standing. >> host: process of e elimination. >> which is consistent in whatever organization it is. i think it is in a sense is a simplified version of reality. i think you used a theory. theory start with simple and you make them more complex. if you take ge famous for the way it chooses lards. ge we always tell our students it's a company that works at practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things we say it should do. it's incredible profitable. if you have to pick them it's good at picking leaders. it's good at developing managers and picking the right people. ge spends twenty years selecting among the organization and slowly promoting them over and over and over again. and so the end of the day, twenty years, so you to work your way up. at the end of
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
machine to take an office boy and get him elected to the senate. truman in his first term is considered the senator from prendergast shunned by the other senators. even in the second term he develops more of a national reputation but he's not an expert on any of these kind of issues. so he gets in there and from the beginning every meeting he has with people he says this is a terrible mistake. i'm not big enough, i am not smart enough. he goes on april 14th, 1st day in office and meets with reporters at the capitol, and they -- she says if you pray, pray for me now. i don't know if you've ever had this fall on you but the moves and the stars and all the other planets have fallen and one of them said good luck mr. president and he said i wish you didn't have to call me that. some of the unsung hero of your book and i know looking at the screen play awhile back about wallace, you know, this is one of the great contractor was of course of the modern american history. but if he had gotten nominated in 1944. and we are doing the but i know that it's from florida and was about to nominate him
of the three parts of the elect ared government. i will fight as hard as i can to minimize this damage. but i got to be honest with you, i mean we got a pretty tough hand to deal with here. and we can't just change that law by ourselves. >> sean: it seems to me senator johnson three things that maybe the president hasn't thought of. number one if the president goes over the fiscal cliff on his watch the optics are not very good for him. while he may think there is an advantage here when the country sees its taxes go up then he comes in as the guy that is the tax cutter. has he tored in the republicans -- factored in the republicans have control of the budget with the debt ceiling? >> i think the president is beginning to see the long-term consequences if we do increase taxes. we maybe ought to do a little celebrating here. democrats are now on board that 98% of bush's tax cuts were a good thing for america and for the economy. let's at least chalk that up as a win. i agree with senator toomey, right now unfortunately only president obama is the one man that can sign a bill into law and withou
consideration to drafting shriver as his running mate in the 1964 election. but the kennedy family, so most historians tell us, wanted robert kennedy to assume political leadership, and eventually hubert humphrey took the vice presidency. shortly after the election, johnson asked shriver to head the war on poverty, some of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, loca
presentation by informing them that his poetry had been dedicated to the president-elect, mr. john finley [laughter] frost had inadvertently stated the name of a scholar from harvard. findlay new frost and may have been a friend of frost. but he was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here's a picture of washington's inauguration the first one in 79 that place in the capitol at the time. the next inaugurations took place in philadelphia and the first one in washington was in 1801. now there is a mess, a legend of the george washington so help me god at the end of the los. but there is no proof that he said that. out of the four words at the time it's come to be a tradition at least from 1933 to the present those words have been added at the end of the los. this is 1929 coming in on the left is the chief justice william howard taft and he is administering the oath of office to the new president herbert hoover. he's the only person ever to be both president and chief justice and you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitution that he said cruisers, maintain and defend and this
for the senate? he said i want to show the world that a well run machine can take an office boy in the election to the senate and truman in's first term there is considered a senator from prendergast. even in his second term he develops more of a national reputation but he is not expert on any of these issues. so he gets in there and write from the beginning every meeting he has with people he says this is a terrible mistake. i'm not take enough and i'm not smart enough and april 13, his first day in office mates meets with the reporters at the capitol. he said voice if you pray for me now, i don't know a few ever had a load of hay fall on you but i feel the moon and stars and all the planets have fallen on me. good luck mr. president. truman says i wish you didn't have to come me that. host go. >> host: back to henry wallace is perhaps the unsung hero of your book and i know as oliver was saying thinking about working on a screenplay a while back about while this. this is one of the great counterfactual's of modern american history. what if wallace had gotten nominated in 1944? in your book, h
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
and eisenhower had such a feud after the 1952 election. until the kennedy assassination. they find themselves sharing a ride together back from the funeral. in that atmosphere, that's when you bury the hatchet. truman said, you want to come up for a drink? and the two end up spending the afternoon and evening drinking together and reuniting. >> and in this what do i do now moment as presidents explains after they leave they're so much more forgiving of those who come after them. like he said, i don't believe our country should undermine our president. that's an astonishing thing in our day and age for a republican president to say about a democratic president, yet he said that. it's very much similar to to what ike said about kennedy. in some ways what reagan even said about carter. so -- at moments. so that's really astonishing understanding, sympathy. >> so let's talk about some of the things that this book uncovers. i can't wait to get doris' take on this. we have to start with the lbj/nixon interaction. and it's sort of like two people holding guns at each other's face. i mean -- >> doubl
and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and hopefully we'll have garnered some support and move forward, so we'll keep sounding that drum beat but tlt be on pause until after january when the new add m*ins -- administrations get all in place, so the problem, this can be really overwhelming, especially if you have not spent a lot of time thinking about this, but i think one of the solutions is just to start with one thing at a time and pick something that resonates for you, whether it's your food or you have kids and you just want to focus on making sure that -- what they're using and taking in is safer, or if it's an area of your life with regard -- we'll talk about this somehow with the fire department or your fire stations or your fire houses or whatever, also reach out to the breast cancer funds, we love q
machine that got truman re-elected in 1940, and ed pauley. ed pauley was a california oil millionaire who said, i went into politics and realized it was cheaper to reflect new congress than buy the old one. he later gets indicted for a good reason. >> his name is on the pavilion in ucla. >> right. the -- so they decided they're going to try to surround roosevelt with all people who are hostile to wallace to convince him he can't get re-elected if wallace was on the ticket. wallace had enemies in 1941 when henry luce made the speech that the 20th center is going to be the united states century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and politically, and wallace responsibled to that and made a famous speech that the 20th 20th century should not be the american century. it should be the century of the common man. we need a worldwide revolution in the tradition of the french. he calls for ending colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was
elected civilian that lived in the white house. mcclellan himself toyed with the idea of. quote, i almost think if i were to win a small success now i could become teeter. he wrote to his wife. and he andy gloried in his newspaper nickname, the young napoleon. he then posed for official photographs with his hands tucked into his tunic. added cabinet meeting on new year's eve, the joint congressional committee on the conduct of the war spent more than 90 minutes asking hard questions about the situation and lincoln's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confedera
. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the fre
after political scientists say the time between election day nov. inauguration day is 11 weeks, that is too short a time for a president to get ready to assume office. lyndon johnson had two hours and six minutes in which he was sworn in on the plane, air force one, let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off of the plane, ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here.
is going to require elected officials to do their jobs. the housing market is recovering, but that could be impacted if people are seeing smaller paychecks. the unemployment rate is the lowest it has been since 2008, but already were saying consumers starting hold back because of the disfunction they see in washington. economists, business leaders, they all think that we are poised to grow in 2013 as long as politics in washington do not get in the way of american progress. we have to get this done. i just want to repeat that we had a constructive meeting today. senators reid and mcconnell are discussing a potential agreement where we can get a bipartisan bill out of the senate and over to the house done in a timely sessions so that we meet the december 31st deadline. given how things have been working in this town, we always have to wait and see until actually happens. the one thing the american people should not have to wait and see is some sort of action. if we don't see an agreement between the two leaders in the senate, i expect a bill to go to the floor. i have asked senator reid t
elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues got resolved on civil rights. legislatively. things moved on. senator byrd gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. no one thinks byrd can replace mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could
? >> absolutely because republicans have won five of the last six elections. the never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity and if they follow the prescription for what will happen is they will cosign themselves with their position. >> i just want to understand this, representing both sides that you both want, right? >> i'm saying the republican party lost, democrats have no mandate and republican don't change they will continue to lose. lou: notice you have to put on me. i said let's examined apollo the possibility of recess. >> we do very well in the midterms. that is because we don't have to do all this. >> nobody taking the blame anybody one. that is just wrong. i want to hear names on the republican side. where is this great talent? >> jeb bush is a great man. he would do immigration reform, a change in policy, change in personality and a very good man. he is somebody worth having a prominent role in this country. >> i'm looking at the operative level. lou: do you know what in the world republican world stands for which mar? reagan had social conservatives, religious conservatives, fisc
're talking about appointing a new senator, or electing somebody, or appointing a member to a board, people are saying why not women, because they're used to seeing more women in more leadership positions, and that has a real role model effect, but it also changes people's perspective about who can be a really strong contributor. >> susan: so what's your advice to young ambitious women just coming out of college or those who have an mba or law degree and want to ride to the top? >> i think they should build their careers in places where they can see that there is support for women and where women have been successful, and that could be a large company that has women at the top. it could be an industry where women are really flourishing. but there's no denying we're going to see a lot of women in a lot of places, and they're going to be very successful, and that's fantastic. >> susie: our partners at stanford >> susie: our partners at stanford university have new research on how women in business tend to turn traits like confidence and assertiveness, on and off, to fit the situation on their
coast. ocean city was the hardest hit in our area. the 2012 election is one for the history books. president barack obama won a second term as president, and here in maryland, an historic day for same sex marriage. starting january 1, those couples can legally wedd. we go into 2013 much as we started 2012, hoping for a super bowl. >> the world did not end on december 21, so it looks like we all better get ready for a busy 2013. >> there is a lot going on tonight in the baltimore area as we get ready to ring in the new year. >> the region's largest fireworks display will kick off with the annual new year's eve spectacular. folks are starting to gather at the inner harbor for all the activities. captain roy taylor is over the area right now. what you folks need to know before they try to get richer ibefore they try to head downtown? >> it is starting to build and is building rapidly. a lot of the cars coming in here appear to be headed to local restaurants. the have not begun to bring in the barges yet for were the fireworks will be set up, but there is a steady flow of traffic work
. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind-boggling to them. it needs to stop. >> reporter: and congressional leaders called friday's talks constructive. >> we'll be working hard to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. so i'm hopeful and optimistic. >> i'm going do everything i can, i'm confident senator mcconnell will do the same. but everybody, this is -- whatever we come up with, it's going to be imperfect. >> reporter: now the president said that he is confident that his plan could make it through the house. of course, that will be a challenge. he would need at least 30 republican votes. the house and senate expected back in session tomorrow. carl? >> kristin welker in washington, thanks. >>> john harwood is cnbc's chief washington correspondent. good morning to you. >> good morning, carl. >> we are down to the wire. a couple of days left. senate leaders are talking. what kind of deal could we be looking at? >> we could be looking at a deal that extends tax cuts for everyone under $400,000 in income. this is the spot that people have been discussin
, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. i
elections. when i wrote this book, the republican majority came out when i was 28, but i have been doing it for 12 or 14 years in terms of research. it is hard to believe. it was not terrific for my social life concentrating on all of this stuff. >> you married and have twins? >> that's right. >> how old are they? >> 37. >> and hal expert are they in the kinds of things that we are talking about? >> they are quite interested. one does political economics. the other consults on things that are fairly political and economic. so you can see that they sort of turned out to be -- i wouldn't say chips off the old block, but certainly in the same ballpark. >> where did you learn how to write? >> i don't really know. i started writing -- the first book i wrote, which did not turn out to be a book because i gave it up for the next one was the "republican majority." i would come to washington as administrative assistant to the congressman. i thought johnson's program was very vulnerable, which it turned out to be. so i wrote this book. it was very stilted and, i wouldn't say formal, but not very w
in different states of how they voted in presidential elections. when i wrote this book, "the emerging republican majority," it came out when i was 28, but i had been doing it 12 or 14 years in terms of research. hard to believe. it was not terrific for my social life to be concentrating on all this stuff. >> you married and have 10 children? >> that's right. >> how old are they? >> 37. chris paul interested in they are thi -- >> how interested are they in this? >> one does political consulting and another is in a related field. it turned out to be sort of i would not say chips off the old block but in the same ballpark. >> where did you learn how to write? >> i don't really know. i started writing the first book, which did not turn out to be a book, because i gave it up for the next one, i started writing in 1965. it was on the politics of fighting the great society. i had come to washington. ipod johnson's program was really vulnerable, as it turned out to be. so i wrote this book. when i looked back on it, it was very stilted and i will not say formal, but it was not very well writ
dull. he was really itching to get back to washington, back to the action. just after nixon was elected, oakley hunter sent a letter to rose mary woods, nixon's secretary. i guess you would say my special field is housing and urban development. there are very few republicans in the field and even fewer who would care to be in a lifeboat with one. i like the ending list a healthy, you are photographing well. hunter was always a lady's and. loved to party. i can show you exclusively a party favor, fannie mae party in that era. hunter also bought a new headquarters for fannie mae. some people said it was the sort of palace louis xiv would have built if he had the money. during nixon's first year in office the fed was fighting inflation. interest-rate wind up and housing starts came down 40%. nixon declared a crisis situation in housing and the solution was more fannie mae. we got a hot -- home financing act of 1970 creating a second government chartered mortgage company freddie mac designed to cater to the s&l industry and more importantly allowed both fannie and freddie to buy a much wide
. they have gerrymandered districts. they're worried about primaries more than general elections, and i think the best case scenario is the senate craft a compromise that both parties can live with and is sort of take it or leave it for the house up against the deadline, and you figure enough house democrats and republicans come together to send it across to the white house. >> steven bennis, white house reporter for roll-call, thank you so much for your time. >> absolutely. >> president obama issued a statement of the status of fiscal cliff negotiations, calling the meeting good and constructive, and he said that senate leaders every read and mitch mcconnell will try to work out a bipartisan compromise bill this weekend. if no deal could be reached, he wants senate majority leader read to introduce a deal that would extend unemployment insurance,. a middle-class tax hike, and the president spoke from the white house briefing room. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> good afternoon, everybody. for the past couple
democracy work." i said, by the way, will it be translated into chinese? the elections in this book are important for the chinese and i believe the chinese leadership would read this book. he said that they are in the middle of trying to do that right now. and sure enough, the book sold very well in china. and justice breyer went to china in june. he was very well received, talking about his book, including what i thought was a wonderful moment of poetic justice. on the cover here -- as you all know, here he is as the cover story. and that is interesting. what i find even more interesting is the date of this magazine is june 4. so, i thought to myself -- that might have been lost on the editor. so, it has thrilled me know wind that someone as imminent as justice breyer has become increasingly engaged on this topic. when we were talking earlier, he talked about during the conversation. and i said, "trust me, i am going to drag you into this thing every step of the way." if you ever lose your day job, you could be a permanent diplomat. we are very pleased to have him here today. where
will begin to define the president's second term. he was elected to lead. >> we also got an update from oulaurie mcginley this morning. >> what kind of a deal did the president offered? what is new on the negotiations among and between the centers in the white house backs -- senators in the white house what is new is the the have seemed to finally agreed they're going to move forward with something. there is no purity that the republican leaders and democratic leader will in fact be able to put together an agreement. the release now saying they are trying to work together and aiming towards a vote. either sunday or monday. i do not believe anyone has been briefed. the residents lack of information among the people were actually good to have to vote -- there is an absolute lack of information among the people who are actually going to have to vote. senators are here, but not in session today. the leaders wanted a day of peace to pull this together. people are going to start to get briefed tomorrow afternoon. >> both majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell expressed optim
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)